Subscribe via Email

If you're not receiving email notifications of new posts, subscribe by entering your email...

Seeing the Details

My weeping birch  11-2

My weeping birch 11-2

The week of rain and wind have blown all the trees nearly bare, but the rain was much needed, and mild weather in between allowed the garden clean up to continue. Now that so much is bare I can notice and admire details. The few leaves left on my weeping birch can be seen individually, the color and form better admired. I also have to wonder about the brain of this birch. Surely it has a brain, or why else would there hardly be any branches on the northwest side of the trunk. The tree was only about a foot tall when I planted it and I  would have thought that the branches would be more evenly distributed, but perhaps after a couple of years of feeling the those northwest winds, bitter in the winter, the tree decided it had to protect itself. It weeps to the south and east. Not what I expected.

Rosa glauca hips

Rosa glauca hips

The rose bushes are bare as well. Several have pretty hips. The attractiveness of the Rosa glauca hips which will turn nearly black were mentioned in the catlog from which I ordered this bush.

Mount Blanc Rose Hips

Mount Blanc Rose Hips

The rugosa Mount Blanc has large fat rose hips. Rugosa rose hips can be used for making a Vitamin C rich tea, or ground and cooked into a jam. A young neighbor and I once spent an afternoon stewing up a pot of rose hip jam.  Once was enough.

Hips of the Mystery Rose

Hips of the Mystery Rose

I thought this rose was Trigintepetala, but a perusal of an illustrated rose book this spring said it is not.  It is vigorous and has spread by runners on the rose walk. I am barely keeping it in control. 

Hips of the multiflora pasture rose

Hips of the multiflora pasture rose

The multiflora rose is the scourge of our fields.  The birds eat the hips and spread the bushes. Everywhere.

The Fairy 11-2

The Fairy 11-2

And look! The Fairy is still blooming. All alone.

4 comments to Seeing the Details

  • Hi pat, how exciting to see Rosa glauca. We just planted one here, it was hard to find too. I had written it down while in Chicago as something good. The hips are lovely. The Fairy looks great too, what a tough little rose to still be blooming like that. We have Fairy Queen, a darker pink that is an offspring I think. Here I am posting about not doing the clean up and you are busy cleaning. 🙂
    Frances

  • admin

    Frances, I hope you are giving the Rosa glauca room. It makes quite a statement, and it doesn’t take too many years. Mine is over 20 years old now. I might have to get a Fairy Queen. The Fairy is a wonderful rose.

  • Nan

    I love that about your birch!

  • admin

    Nan, all the trees on our hill, are kind of aero- dynamic.
    Pat

Leave a Reply