How Seeds of Solidarity Began and Three Forms of No-Till Farming

  • Post published:May 24, 2019

In 1996 Ricky Baruch and Deb Habib got the biggest Christmas present they might ever receive. On December 28 they officially became the owners of a piece of rocky land in Orange. They were about to plant their own farm. I first met Baruch and Habib in early May of 2009 when I visited Seeds of Solidarity farm. Even though they had been farming for 13 years the land still looked rough and rocky. However, they had built…

Greenfield Garden Club – Lots to Love and Work For

  • Post published:May 17, 2019

When asked what they loved about the Greenfield Garden Club, the gardeners who attended the Annual Meeting at the John Zon Community Center last month had a lot of answers. They called out that they loved meeting other gardeners, learning from other gardeners, sharing plants, socializing and going on trips together. Club members liked learning more about the environment and how our gardens benefit the environment. They also loved giving gardening grants to local schools, and making the…

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – May 15, 2019

  • Post published:May 15, 2019

I am celebrating Garden Blogger's Bloom Day with special pleasure because the blooms have been reluctant to open because of rain, floods and the cold.  Above is Dicentra eximia or fringed leaf bleeding heart. This grows against the house foundation right by the side door and is one of the first to bloom. I am  sure this is because the foundation on the south side of the house creates a heat sink.  It is very cheering this cold…

Bridge of Flowers – 90th Anniversary and Plant Sale

  • Post published:May 10, 2019

In 1908 a new trolley bridge started bringing milk, cotton products and passengers from Colrain to Shelburne Falls. In 1929 the trolley was no longer needed and the bridge became the Bridge of Flowers. The transformation began when Antoinette Burnham looked at the neglected bridge and thought that surely a bridge that could grow so many weeds, could grow flowers instead. That was the beginning of the conversion from industry to garden. Julius Blassberg bought the bridge and…

Invasive Plants – Beauty and Destruction

  • Post published:May 4, 2019

Invasive plants can be beautiful but they are also destructive. Gardeners are becoming more aware of the dangers of invasive plants, as well as the benefits of pollinator plants. We are now realizing there is more to designing our gardens than aesthetics. We have to consider our environment, how plants and wildlife interact. One of the most common and often used invasive shrubs is Burning bush, Euonymus alatas. It is popular for its beautiful red foliage in the…