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Dear Friend and Gardener

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – a day late

Montauk daisy

Montauk daisy on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day

I am a day late with Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day, but yesterday was spent moving the last big items from Heath to our new house and garden in Greenfield. This post records what little is in bloom in Heath on my last Heath bloom day and what is in bloom in my very unfinished garden in Heath.

 Heath Garden

Colchium autumnale

Colchium atumnale

These autumn crocus still blooming in all their weedy glory. They are in a bad spot for display – but I never got around to moving them.

Sedum 'Neon'

Sedum ‘Neon’

Sedum ‘Neon’ is looking very healthy. I did take a piece down to Greenfield where it blooms in the hellstrip.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck is not quite the last rose of summer. We are still enjoying a few Fairy roses as well.

Sheffield daisies

Sheffield daisies

Sheffies, Sheffield daisies are very late bloomers. I thought I brought some down to Greenfield, but alas no. Maybe there is still time.

Hydrangea 'Limelight'

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

The Heath hydrangeas are doing very well this year. Mothlight is as huge as ever, Limelight doesn’t look too lime-y, but looks great next to Pinky Winky.

Greenfield Garden

Nameless hydrangea

Nameless hydrangea

This hydrangea came with the house. I don’t know anything about it so far, except that the former owners cut it down to the ground last fall.  And look at it now.  I guess it is time to cut it back again. The new hydrangeas that I planted, Angel Blush, Limelight and Firelight seem to be doing OK, but they are not really photo-worthy right now.

Dahlia 'Firepot'

Dahlia ‘Firepot’

This dahlia came from the Bridge of Flowers and I think it is ‘Firepot.’  I also have a wonderful purple dahlia from the Bridge. I plan to have more dahlias next year.

 

Gazania

Gazania

It took a while but this gazania finally took hold after our dry summer. I did try to keep watering.

Joe Pye Weed

Joe Pye Weed

I planted Joe Pye Weed because it is tolerant of  wet sites, but once we began our dry summer it only had one chance, after 5 inches of rain one day, to show that it was happy in the wet.

Perennial ageratum

Perennial ageratum

A few divisions of this perennial ageratum, sometimes called mist flower, was given to me by a friend. I had to cut them back substantially when I planted them in August, but I still  got bloom. I have been told to expect a good increase next year.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

I can’t think how I acquired this floriferous late blooming chrysanthemum, but I love it. I have some growing in the hellstrip, but with only a bloom or two, although lots of buds, because it is so shady.

 

Chelone or turtlehead

Chelone or turtlehead

I cut back the chelone before I moved it down to Greenfield but here is  one bold blossom.

 

Woods blue aster

Woods blue aster

I brought a few low growing woods blue aster to Greenfield because it is such a good spreader and late bloomer.

 

Tricyrtis

Tricyrtis or toad lily

At the Bridge of Flowers Plant Sale we sold a lot of tiny Tricyrtis, or toad lily plants, but we had many left. I have been growing them on and you can expect to see these hardy and very interesting plants at the Plant Sale next May.

Pink Drift rose

Pink Drift rose

This pink Drift is not quite the last rose of summer either. Again The Fairy in Greenfield still has a few blooms.

And that is my first Bloom Day in Greenfield. A hard frost is predicted for the next couple of days. And maybe even snow!

Many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Garden for hosting Bloom Day!

Bloom Day August 2015 AND Giveaway

Bloom day tangle Coneflowers, phlox, cosmos and Russian Sage

Bloom day tangle Coneflowers, phlox, cosmos and Russian Sage

On this Bloom Day it is clear I haven’t spent as much time as usual on the Heath Garden. And yet, there are blooms like this tangle of phlox, coneflowers, Russian sage and cosmos. I can always count on cosmos to fill in. I’m trying not to capture the vigor of the weeds.

Echinops
Echinops

There is also a tangle of Echinops down in a corner of the Sunken Garden which I often fail to mention.

Casa Blanca lily

Casa Planca lily and phlox

In all the tangles the Casa blanca lily looks calm and serene.

Black Beauty lilies and bee balm

Black Beauty lilies and Bee balm

The bee balm is  a tangle with the Black Beauty lilies that are still going strong, although the blossoms are not as large as usuaal. Crowded? Needing more compost? Investigation required.

Ann Varner Daylily

Ann Varner Daylily

The Daylily Bank is going by, but Ann Varner, a late daylily, is keeping things  going.

Of course t here are a few other things in bloom, heleniums, hydrangeas, thalictrum, Henrii lilies, and the Thomas Affleck rose.  At the Greenfield house the new Knockout Red rose is blooming, as are the hydrangeas. Next year should be much more floriferous on the Shrub and rose bed. I hope.  For more views of what is blooming across this great land go on over to visit Carol, our host, at May Dreams Gardens.

No irises in bloom now, but if you want to take a chance on winning the beautiful book Beardless Iriises: A plant for every garden situation click here and leave a comment at the bottom of the post. I will draw the name of the lucky  winner on August 19.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – July 2015

Angel Blush Hydrangea

Angel Blush Hydrangea

On this Garden Bloggers Bloom Day I am celebrating blooms in two gardens, although I dearly hope it will not be too long before I am once again tending a single, small garden. In Greenfield the hydrangeas in the Shrub and Rose border are beginning to bloom even though they were planted only a month ago. Angel Blush is joined by Limelight and Firelight. These hydrangeas will form a beautiful privacy fence.

Button Bush

Buttonbush

Buttonbush was only planted two weeks ago, but once in the very wet ground it finally burst into bloom. It has been waiting in its pot for over a month.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

In Heath the Thomas Affleck rose continues to endure the rain, and all the other oddities of this year’s weather. Needless to say, another Thomas Affleck has been planted in Greenfield, but not permitted to bloom this year.

Purington rambler

Purington rambler

It has not been a great year for many of the rose bushes, but the Purington rambler hasn’t minded the bitter winter, or the undependable spring and summer. I wish someone could tell me how to properly weed such a vicious plant. I suppose putting it up on a fence might help instead of letting it tumble on the Rose bank.

The Fairy rose

The Fairy rose

Only a very few rose blossoms elsewhere in the garden, but I can always count on the Fairy even though she is a bit more petite this year.

Achillea Terra Cotta

Achillea Terra Cotta and yellow loossestrife

I am taking bits of the the various Achilleas and the old yellow loosestrife down to the new Greenfield garden.

Coneflowers

Coneflowers

The coneflowers are blooming in front of the pink cosmos which you can’t see, but they are very pretty together.

Daylily bank

Daylily Bank

Daylilies never mind any kind of difficult weather and this is their season.

Daylilies

Daylilies

Some of these daylilies are making their way down to the Greenfield garden.

Mothlight hydrangea

Mothlight hydrangea

The Mothlight hydrangea in Heath is about 12 years old and has never been so exuberant. Will the Greenfield hydrangeas look like this? Limelight and Pinky Winky are also just coming into bloom.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloom Day which gives us all a chance to share our gardens, and see what is blooming all over this great land. Click here for more blooms.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – May 2015

old apple tree in bloom

Old apple tree in bloom

It has been a  while since I have been able to post on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, but May has brought many blooms to the end of the road. Old apple trees and wild cherries  are blooming in the garden , along the road and in the fields.

Apple blossom closeup

Apple blossom closeup

Blooming trees are wonderful, and each blossom is a delight.

Sargent Crab

Sargent crabapple

The Sargent crabapple could not fit any more blossoms on itself.

Sargent crab apple blossoms

Sargent crab blossoms

Didn’t I tell you no more blossoms could fit on a branch?

Cotoneaster in bloom

Cotoneaster in bloom

I never get over my initial surprise that cotoneaster bears flowers!

Ornamental plum blooming

Ornamental plum blooming

How is it possible that I never noticed blossoms on this ornamental plum?  Could this year be the first time? The tree has to be at least 15 years old in this spot.

Bluets

Bluets

Sometimes bluets appear in the fields, or the lawn. These bluets seem almost white

Epimedium sulphureum

Epimedium sulphureum

This clump of Epimedium sulphureum has increased so much. So has Epimedium rubrum on the other side of this lawn bed.

Daffodils, Waldsteinia and tiarlla

Daffodils, Waldsteinia and tiarella

My idea was to get rid of grass, and this area on the road side of the Peony Bed is coming along. Waldsteinia or barren strawberry is a native groundcover that has little yellow strawberry-like flowers.  This isn’t a good photo but in the upper portion of the photo, up against the peonies is a growing section of tiarella. The white blossoms are so foamy that they don’t show up in a photo – even from this little distance.

lilacs

Lilacs

Not a great photo, but these are great old white lilacs that have been at the end of the road since long before we arrived. There are old lilac lilacs, too, but we have added pink Miss Canada and Pocahontas, the white Miss Ellen Willmott and the Beauty of Moscow. I just this moment noticed that these are all ladies.

Dandelions and violets

Dandelions and violets

There are other bloomers: the forsythia is going by; grape hyacinths in the lawn here and  there; a pot of sunny pansies; and of course, that common weed, the dandelion blooming in the lawn with violets and ground ivy. My own springtime flowery mead.

Carol, I am glad to be posting on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day once again. Thank you so much for hosting over at May Dreams Gardens. New dreams are coming true this May.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – August 15, 2014

Roses and lilies, mostly

Roses and lilies, mostly

On this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day there are great clumps of bloomers and I can see a busy fall season of digging and dividing. Here the Thomas Affleck rose and Henryii lilies are lush and full of pollinators. You can also see a cloud of meadow rue flowers. I just love this section of the garden right next to the house.

Black Beauty lilies and crimson bee balm

Black Beauty lilies and crimson bee balm

This Bloom Day the Black Beauty lilies and the crimson bee balm make a great combo – even if they are standing exactly straight and tall.

8-14 phlox etc

This section of the North Lawn Bed is one of the places that whisper, ” Dig me!  Divide me!”  Phlox, pink and white, cone flower, Russian sage and even a lily  that the deer missed at their luncheon party a few weeks ago.

8-14 the pearl, mardi grass yarrow

This is another section of the North Lawn Bed where Achillea “the Pearl is rampant in front of  sunny “Mardi Gras”. On the other side of the path you can see a passalong and nameless yarrow, bits of Blue Paradise phlox and Connecticut Yankee delphinium.

Yarrow

Yarrow

I don’t think this yarrow is Coronaation Gold, but I am going to cut it and see if it dries well.

Ann Varner daylily

Ann Varner daylily

Of course, August is daylily season and Ann Varner is at her peak.

The Fairy rose

The Fairy rose

Except for Thomas Affleck and The Fairy, rose season is over.

Cimicifuga

Cimicifuga

The tall candles of  cimicifuga, snakeroot, look very cool in  the shade of the ancient apple tree.

 

Artemesia lactiflora

Artemesia lactiflora

Like the meadow rue, Artemesia lactiflora has very unusual airy blossoms, but dark foliage.

Hydrangea 'Limelight'

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

The hydrangeas are in bloom.  ’Mothlight’ the oldest is almost as tall as the weeping birch next to it. ‘Limelight’ is very happy and the oakleaf hydrangea is recovering from deer browing. The bucket loader is there because our driveway is actually town road and the road crew is repairing damage by our heavy rain storms. There hasn’t been  an unusual amount of rain, but when it comes, it comes down hard and all at once.

 

Toremia

Toremia

Toremia is a new annual to me. It grows on the Bridge of Flowers and love it. No deadheading necessary.

 

Cuphea

Cuphea

Cuphea is another new-to-me annual growing in pots in front of the house. The colors are fabulous!

Love Lies Bleeding

Love Lies Bleeding

I first saw Love Lies Bleeding, an amaranth, planted in the ground at Wave Hill in New York. I was stunned  by the aptness of its name, and at Wave Hill it was a heroic love that had died bleeding.  I think I will have to plant it in the ground next year. I am perplexed by the differently shapped pendant flower cluster. One looks like pompoms and the other more tassel-like.  Any ideas?

For more of what is blooming over this great land visit Carol, our hostess, over at May Dreams Gardens on this Bloom Day.

 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – June 15- 2014

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day - stocks

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – stocks

On this sunny, cool (72 degrees) but breezy, Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, bloom is beginning to arrive. These stocks are in the Herb Bed right in front of the house, where there is also an array of potted geraniums, petunias and such. They are not doing terribly well because the weather remains so cool.

Rhododendron 'Calsap'

Rhododendron ‘Calsap’

Calsap will stand in for all the plants in the corner that have gone by, the 2 tree peonies, as well as Boule de Neige and Rangoon rhodies. The herbaceous peonies are late, but there are a couple of fat buds. The advantage to me, and visitors to the Annual Rose Viewing on June 29 is that there will be lots of peony bloom, as well as rose bloom.

Siberian iris

Siberian iris

Siberian irises are just beginning. White ones too.

L. martagon 'Album'

L. martagon ‘Album’

I didn’t really have any idea of the delicacy of this martagon lily when I bought it from Old House Gardens. This is my first bloom year with it and it is only about 3 feet tall, but it is said to need some patience. Perhaps next year it will be a bit taller. I think it is just beautiful.

Rugosa rose 'Agnes'

Rugosa rose ‘Agnes’

I’ve mislabelled this elsewhere, but this is the ‘Agnes’ the first of the rugosas to bloom. The rugosas in general are the first roses to bloom and I have quite a few.

Scabrosa

Scabrosa

Another rugosa, Scabrosa, is spreading every which  way on the Rose Walk.

Rugosa Therese Bugnet

Rugosa Therese Bugnet

Therese Bugnet is a dependable rugosa, even after like the winter we have just “enjoyed.”

Blanc Double de Coubert

Blanc Double de Coubert

Blanc Double de Coubert, a popular white rugosa took a beating this winter, but it is reviving.

Dart's Dash  rugosa

Dart’s Dash rugosa

On the other hand, Dart’s Dash is spreading beautifully on the Rose Bank.  You can see the distinctive ribbed rugosa foliage on all these plants. No bugs. No disease.

6-15-14 Purington pinkPurington’s Pink is a rose that just exploded. You can  see all the new growth in this photo. It didn’t mind the winter at all. Purington Pink was given to me by Herb and Barbara Purington who farm in Colrain.

Rose season is just beginning. Other perennials in bloom are May Night Salvia, Joan Elliot campanula, Achillea Paprika, trollius, and a host of volunteer pansies. I do not object to pansies or any other volunteers. I do object to deer that have eaten lily buds, Japanese anemone and veronicas!

Thank you Carol for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloom Day over at May Dreams Gardens. There is a lot to see in gardens all across the nation at this time of year.

Death on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day

Dead-ish Poinsettia

For me, Garden Bloggers Bloom Day is a bust this month. This poinsettia has been living happily on our dining table, in front of a big southern window since Christmas.  At night we close the lined curtains, to slightly moderate heat loss. I’ve kept it watered, but yesterday I came downstairs and when I opened the curtains I saw that it was withered and drooping. I don’t think it was below 32 degrees in our living space, but it was cool.  Did several nights of zero degree temperatures prove too much for it?  What happened?  Any ideas?

Cyclamen

This cyclamen did pretty well on this uncurtained windowsill, but a couple of weeks ago I noticed that the window side of the plant was dying. I suspect the plant will recover. In the fall. Unlike poinsettias, cyclamen don’t mind cold weather, although putting it right next to  window was probably too much to ask.

That is my sad report on this Garden Bloggers Bloom Day in February 2014, but I am sure you will find many happier stories if you click here.  I can always count on our hos Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for optimism.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – October 2013

 

Thomas Affleck rose

On this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day in my Massachusetts hilltop garden we have  come through only one good frost, but the garden is slowly falling to sleep. Thomas Affleck is still blooming, and sporadic blossoms are still being thrown out by The Fairy, Meideland red and white, Hawkeye Belle and Knock Out Double Red.

The Fairy

Grandpa Ott

Grandpa Ott is a morning glory that is still blooming, in front of the house and down in the Potager, as we grandly call the vegetable garden. The Potager is still enjoying blooming annual salvia, annual gomphrena, zinnias, and Agastache ‘Cana’ which will definitely have to be divided in the spring!

 

Blue lobelia

The standard blue lobelia has been quietly blooming all summer long.

Japanese anemone

I love my Japanese anemone – and so do the deer. Not much is left of her.

 

‘Starlet’ spoon mums

‘Starlet’ spoon mum is struggling a bit, but I appreciate her golden face.

Purple aster

Fall is time for asters, but pink Alma Potchke is already gone.

Sheffield daisies

Sheffield daisies, sheffies, are wonderful strong growers that bloom into October. Mine have barely started. My Montauk daisies have also barely begun.

Nasturtiums

I will end the Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day post with some sunny nasturtiums. The day itself promises sunny, and time to get  out and continue cutting back and cleaning the garden.

Thank you Carol for hosting  Garden Bloggers’s Bloom Day. I’ve gotten a headstart today but you’ll  be able to see what else is blooming all over the  country here.

Bloom Day September 15, 2013

Alma Potchke aster

It has been quite a summer! Rain all through June. Drought all through July. And a very dry August, so you can imagine how I welcome the 2 inches of rain last week. The garden has been thirsty most of the season so some plants have really suffered, but bloom will entirely be denied.  Alma Potchke has just begun to bloom

Neon sedum

Right next to Alma Potchke is this sedum which I think is Neon.  It doesn’t look that bright, but I like it, and it hasn’t minded the variable weather. Hot. Cold. Dry. Wet.

Lisianthus

This spring I planted a flat of the tiniest lisianthus seedlings. It is only this month that I have gotten any blooms. This is a real ‘florist’s flower’ and it is beautiful, but I think it needs a little more cosseting than I tend to give my plants. You can see there is a remnant of a phlox next to it, and remnants of phlox appear in a ragged way throughout the garden.

Japanese anemone

This is the second year for this Japanese anemone. The clump is larger, but very short this year. I think maybe due to so much dry weather.

Cosmos

In the Herb Bed there is a small tangle of cosmos blooming with Grandpa Ott morning glory and fighting with the horseradish which I thought I had totally dug out.

 

Acidanthra

I stuck some extra acidanthra bulbs in the Herb Bed next to the bee balm. They do not show to best advantage here. That’s what happens when you’ve run out of time and thought in the spring. The acidanthra does not seem insulted however.

Thomas Affleck

The ever dependable Thomas Affleck rose continues to bloom at the end of the Herb Bed. There are occasional blooms on Buck roses, Hawkeye Belle and Folksinger, but this not rose season at the end of the road.

There are a few zinnias and gomphrena down in the vegetable garden, the hydrangeas look great and I am glad to note that the season is not over.

I am a day late, but still glad to join in Garden Bloggers Bloom Day hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – August 15, 2013

Ann Varner Dayliliy

On this Garden Bloggers Bloom day there are some surprises.  The weather should not surprise anymore, but it does, and often causes gnashing of teeth. In June we had a glorious 12 inches of rain. In July there was no rain! It was hot! An official heat wave. In August it has been much cooler and we had 4 inches of rain so far. Still there are lots of blooms in the un-irrigated flower gardens. The Daylily Bank is drawing down but Ann Varner is still magnificent.

Helenium “Mardi Gras”

In spite of the dry, and now cool weather the Helenium  is a colorful clump.

Black Beauty lilies

I have to lie under them to get a shot of the Black Beauties. The blossoms of the lilies and the adjacent crimson bee  balm are not very big this year. Note to self. More compost in this spot. The other lilies are also still blooming by the house.

Artemesia lactiflora

Artemesia lactiflora has much less dramatic blossoms,  but they are dainty, and much taller than usual this year.

Achillea ‘The Pearl’

Achillea is another dainty flower, but a strong grower. The only other yarrow blooming now is the sulphur yellow variety. Nameless.

Joe Pye Weed

This new Joe Pye Weed has just come into bloom.  I don’t know if it is a miniature, or just not fully feeling its oats this first year.

Echinacea and Miss Lingaard phlox

The big clump of Echinacea purpurea will need to be divided but it is gorgeous this year. The white phlox is Miss Lingaard and it should have bloomed in June!  The Russian sage on the other side of the Echinacea is also blooming well.

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

‘Limelight’ is the only one of the three ‘new’ hydrangeas to have recovered very well from a good browsing from the deer, but ‘Pinky Winky’ and the oakleaf hydrangea do have a few small blossoms.

Thomas Affleck rose

A visiting friend sighed that there were probably no roses anymore. Well, not quite. Thomas Affleck, as usual, is putting out a strong second flush, and other roses put out an occasional bloom

Folksinger

Folksinger, a Griffith Buck hybrid also put out a good second flush. I couldn’t resist taking this photo of his delicate decline. I do not think he has much strength left for this season.

Also blooming are the tall veronicas, very tall and deeply blue aconite, cimicifuga, a few zinnias and  gomphrena. Not too bad, and there is still more to come which makes me happy.

To see what else is  blooming across our  great nation go to May Dreams Gardens where Carol hosts Bloom Day. Thank you Carol!