If you're not receiving email notifications of new posts, subscribe by entering your email...

Dear Friend and Gardener

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – June 15, 2017

OSO Easy Paprika rose

OSO Easy Paprika rose

On this June Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day the rose have burst into bloom. It has been a cold and wet spring, but  our last couple of days have been in the 90s. The weather gods show just how unpredictable they can be. For me, this spring is is the first really floriferous June we have had.  All the roses but one are new plants and they are really showing off.

Drift rose - Peach

Drift Rose – Peach

This peach Drift rose blooms right next to Paprika. Both of them are low growing landscape roses and require very little care.

Purple Rain - Kordes rose

Purple Rain – a Kordes rose

Kordes started hybridizing disease resistant roses over 30 years ago. No herbicides needed. This is another low growing rose.

Folksinger rose

Folksinger – Griffith Buck rose

I had a Folksinger rose up in  Heath, but it never looked this good.

Polar Express rose

Polar Express – another Kordes rose

This is an elegant icy  white rose. I love all the Kordes roses.

Knockout Red

Knockout Red rose

Knockout Red supplies  the red red rose, that’s newly sprung in June.

Alchemyst rose

Alchemyst Rose

By the time you are looking at all these roses I am sure that Fantin-Latour,and  Lion’s Fairy Tale will also be in full bloom.  I think I have to wait a little longer for The Fairy and Purington Pink to bloom. But of course, there are other bloomers in June.

Alchemyst  rose

Alchemyst rose

I’m adding this closeup because the rose is so lovely – and just now in full bloom.

White delphinium

White delphinium

This delphinium has already lost one blooming stem in a storm, but it looked very pretty on our dinner table.

Japanese primroses

Japanese primroses

It is amazing that the Japanese primroses are still showing bloom – but it has been very wet.

Siberian white iris

Siberian white iris

I have three lovely clumps of white Siberians. And friends waiting for a piece of this dependable beauty.

Blue siberian iris

Blue Siberian iris

I have three big clumps of blue Siberians, but these are coming up in a clump of weeds in the North Border. They will  not give up. Of course, this is another very wet spot.

Thank you Carol for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. Visit May Dreams Gardens and see what else is blooming over our great land.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day, May 15, 2017

Wood poppy

Wood poppy

This is my first Bloom Day post in quite a while. Here in my corner of western Massachusetts we are having quite a wet spring. Yesterday over 2 inches of rain fell, causing about the worst flooding in the backyard that we have had  so far. Even so, blooms are surviving.  The wood poppy is growing on our hugel so it is not flooded but has plenty of water to drink.

Barren strawberry

Barren strawberry or waldensteinia

There is quite a  golden look to the garden right now. Barren strawberry is a great ground cover and is making a great border at the edge of the hugel’s stone wall.

Trollius laxa

Trollius laxa

Trollius laxa is a paler gold. I am wondering if I planted Trollius europeanus which is a taller, more golden globeflower. I used to have it in my old garden.

Doronicum

Doronicum or leopard’s bane

This is the single survivor of a little patch I planted last spring.  More gold.

golden alexanders

Golden alexandaers

Golden alexanders even have gold in their name. I planted two clumps last year and they are spreading nicely on the bank of  the hugel.

Geum

Geum

I am not sure which geum this is, but it bloomed all summer last year and well into the fall. What a plant!

Geum trifolium

Geum trifolium

Geum trifolium is also called Prairie Smoke. The little blossoms will soon be surrounded by delicate haze of smoke – somewhat like the cotina smokebush but on a more delicate and linear scale. Photos will follow in season.

Fringed bleeding hearts

Fringed bleeding hearts also called Dutchman’s Breeches

These were left by the previous owners of our house, but after cleaning out the bed they have thrived. I  found a small clump of white fringed bleeding hearts which I think came in on the root of a purchased dappled willow.

columbine

columbine

Columbine is beginning to bloom.

tiarella

Tiarella or foam flower

The tiarella is enjoying a long slow season of bloom this cool wet spring.

black chokeberry

Aronia, black chokeberry

This aronia, black chokeberry, is coming along very slowly, but I wanted to include it because I am trying  to keep track of bloom times.

Japanese primrose

Japanese primrose

Bloom is just starting, but there is a good spread of  these beautiful flowers in  the wettest part of the garden. They were planted last year – gifts from friends – and are thriving. Thank heaven for friends with different plants in their garden.

little irises - nameless

little irises – nameless

These nameless little irises are doing fine, even in all the wet. You can see the flood just behind the irises and I can tell you that I sink into the lawn when I come near. Because our garden is so wet I have a number of clumps of Siberian and Japanese irises.

Spring flood tide

Spring flood tide

When you look at the photo of the little irises you can see water behind them, but this is a view of the major part of the garden. Our garden is very wet  for a variety of reasons. Yards on either side of ours are paved and at a slightly higher level which means some water drains into our garden. Our soil is heavy clay and drains very slowly. The garden beds are all slightly raised to provide better  soil as well as a lift from standing water. There is also an underground stream that flows the length of our street. The water can take several days to infiltrate. You can see why I have included so many water loving/tolerant plants.

Thank you Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for giving us Garden Bloggers Bloom Day and the ability to see what is blooming all over our great land.

Bloom Day – November 15, 2015

Pink Chrysanthemums

Pink Chrysanthemums on November Bloom Day

On this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day in Greenfield, Mass, still boasting only a Zone 5 rating, my very late blooming pink chrysanthemums are still blooming. We have had frost, and some rain and wind, but these dependable beauties are still going. They are the only thing blooming outside.We are still not having freezing night temperatures as a regular thing, though it does get down below 40 degrees.

Prostrate rosemary in bloom

Prostrate rosemary in bloom

This prostrate rosemary was taken out of a pot and put into Greenfield soil this summer, and has seemed to tolerate the move into another pot for the winter. So far she has been able to live on the enclosed side porch. I admit you have to look pretty close to see those few tiny blue blooms.

Thanksgiving cactus

Red Thanksgiving cactus

This Thanksgiving cactus never seems to do much. Probably needs repotting. However she always blooms on schedule.

Thanksgiving cactus in a pale shade

Thanksgiving cactus in a pale shade

In  the guest room window a pretty pale pink Thanksgiving cactus is just starting to come into bloom. I bought her last Thanksgiving and she is doing pretty well. You can at least one of my holdover amaryllis will actually bloom again. This might be the first time I have managed a second year’s bloom. Although I never tried very hard before.

And so ends Bloom Day. I am barely getting in under the wire.

Thank you Carol  for  hosting Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day on May Dreams Gardens which allows us to see all the blooms across the the nation by clicking here.

 

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – a day late

Montauk daisy

Montauk daisy on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day

I am a day late with Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day, but yesterday was spent moving the last big items from Heath to our new house and garden in Greenfield. This post records what little is in bloom in Heath on my last Heath bloom day and what is in bloom in my very unfinished garden in Heath.

 Heath Garden

Colchium autumnale

Colchium atumnale

These autumn crocus still blooming in all their weedy glory. They are in a bad spot for display – but I never got around to moving them.

Sedum 'Neon'

Sedum ‘Neon’

Sedum ‘Neon’ is looking very healthy. I did take a piece down to Greenfield where it blooms in the hellstrip.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck is not quite the last rose of summer. We are still enjoying a few Fairy roses as well.

Sheffield daisies

Sheffield daisies

Sheffies, Sheffield daisies are very late bloomers. I thought I brought some down to Greenfield, but alas no. Maybe there is still time.

Hydrangea 'Limelight'

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

The Heath hydrangeas are doing very well this year. Mothlight is as huge as ever, Limelight doesn’t look too lime-y, but looks great next to Pinky Winky.

Greenfield Garden

Nameless hydrangea

Nameless hydrangea

This hydrangea came with the house. I don’t know anything about it so far, except that the former owners cut it down to the ground last fall.  And look at it now.  I guess it is time to cut it back again. The new hydrangeas that I planted, Angel Blush, Limelight and Firelight seem to be doing OK, but they are not really photo-worthy right now.

Dahlia 'Firepot'

Dahlia ‘Firepot’

This dahlia came from the Bridge of Flowers and I think it is ‘Firepot.’  I also have a wonderful purple dahlia from the Bridge. I plan to have more dahlias next year.

 

Gazania

Gazania

It took a while but this gazania finally took hold after our dry summer. I did try to keep watering.

Joe Pye Weed

Joe Pye Weed

I planted Joe Pye Weed because it is tolerant of  wet sites, but once we began our dry summer it only had one chance, after 5 inches of rain one day, to show that it was happy in the wet.

Perennial ageratum

Perennial ageratum

A few divisions of this perennial ageratum, sometimes called mist flower, was given to me by a friend. I had to cut them back substantially when I planted them in August, but I still  got bloom. I have been told to expect a good increase next year.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

I can’t think how I acquired this floriferous late blooming chrysanthemum, but I love it. I have some growing in the hellstrip, but with only a bloom or two, although lots of buds, because it is so shady.

 

Chelone or turtlehead

Chelone or turtlehead

I cut back the chelone before I moved it down to Greenfield but here is  one bold blossom.

 

Woods blue aster

Woods blue aster

I brought a few low growing woods blue aster to Greenfield because it is such a good spreader and late bloomer.

 

Tricyrtis

Tricyrtis or toad lily

At the Bridge of Flowers Plant Sale we sold a lot of tiny Tricyrtis, or toad lily plants, but we had many left. I have been growing them on and you can expect to see these hardy and very interesting plants at the Plant Sale next May.

Pink Drift rose

Pink Drift rose

This pink Drift is not quite the last rose of summer either. Again The Fairy in Greenfield still has a few blooms.

And that is my first Bloom Day in Greenfield. A hard frost is predicted for the next couple of days. And maybe even snow!

Many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Garden for hosting Bloom Day!

Bloom Day September 2015 – Here and There

Anemone Robustissima, cosmos, Achillea The Pearl

Anemone Robustissima, cosmos, Achillea The Pearl

Bloom Day in Heath

Bloom Day in Heath has wild asters and cultivated asters and autumn is in full swing. The photo above shows a tangle of Japanese anemone ‘Robustissima’, annual cosmos and Achillea The Pearl. But there is more.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

I will let dependable the Thomas Affleck roses that are blooming less floriferously – The Fairy, the Meidelland roses, and Champlain, one of the Explorer roses.

 

Foxglove

A surprise – foxglove

I couldn’t resist including this photo of a surprise foxglove – a reminder of the  generous bloom for a good part of the summer.

Sedum 'Neon'

Sedum ‘Neon’ with bee

I only caught ‘Neon’ with one bee, but the sedums, along with garlic chives in bloom now, physostogia, and bee  balm all lure lots of pollinators.

 

Achillea

Achillea

I don’t know the name of this golden yarrow with the heavy silver foliage, but it is the latest blooming yarrow in my garden this year.

Bloom Day in Greenfield

Hydrangea 'Firelight'

Hydrangea ‘Firelight’

The hydrangea ‘Firelight’ is standing in for the other hydrangea, ‘Limelight’ and ‘Blushing Angel’ which are also blooming. They have had a pretty good year and were almost the first shrubs I planted in June.

Dahlia 'Firepot'

Dahlia ‘Firepot’

I planted three dahlias in the rose and shrub border, counting on them to fill up a lot of space with color, and they have come through. The roses all seem to be settling in safely. We’ll see how they come through the winter.

OSO Easy rose 'Paprika'

OSO Easy rose “Paprika’

I couldn’t resist this bright orange-y rose when I saw it in bloom in the nursery. It is one of the small, and newer disease resistant roses that is on the market. I have it planted in a spot that is very sunny and has slightly better soil.

Joe Pye Weed

Joe Pye Weed

Joe Pye weed is a native plant but this is a hybrid with variegated foliage. It is a big plant and I think it will look great next year.

 

Artemesia lactiflora

Artemesia lactiflora

Artemesia lactiflora, which I also have blooming in Heath, doesn’t photograph very well, the flowers are so fine, but it is a great plant with dark stems and foliage, and a good increaser.

 

Alma Potschke aster

Alma Potschke aster

Alma Potschke blooms in Heath too, but the former owners of this house kindly left this generous clump for me. I love Alma.  And so ends Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day in Heath and Greenfield

Thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Bloom Day and click here to see  what else is blooming around the country.

Bloom Day August 2015 AND Giveaway

Bloom day tangle Coneflowers, phlox, cosmos and Russian Sage

Bloom day tangle Coneflowers, phlox, cosmos and Russian Sage

On this Bloom Day it is clear I haven’t spent as much time as usual on the Heath Garden. And yet, there are blooms like this tangle of phlox, coneflowers, Russian sage and cosmos. I can always count on cosmos to fill in. I’m trying not to capture the vigor of the weeds.

Echinops
Echinops

There is also a tangle of Echinops down in a corner of the Sunken Garden which I often fail to mention.

Casa Blanca lily

Casa Planca lily and phlox

In all the tangles the Casa blanca lily looks calm and serene.

Black Beauty lilies and bee balm

Black Beauty lilies and Bee balm

The bee balm is  a tangle with the Black Beauty lilies that are still going strong, although the blossoms are not as large as usuaal. Crowded? Needing more compost? Investigation required.

Ann Varner Daylily

Ann Varner Daylily

The Daylily Bank is going by, but Ann Varner, a late daylily, is keeping things  going.

Of course t here are a few other things in bloom, heleniums, hydrangeas, thalictrum, Henrii lilies, and the Thomas Affleck rose.  At the Greenfield house the new Knockout Red rose is blooming, as are the hydrangeas. Next year should be much more floriferous on the Shrub and rose bed. I hope.  For more views of what is blooming across this great land go on over to visit Carol, our host, at May Dreams Gardens.

No irises in bloom now, but if you want to take a chance on winning the beautiful book Beardless Iriises: A plant for every garden situation click here and leave a comment at the bottom of the post. I will draw the name of the lucky  winner on August 19.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – July 2015

Angel Blush Hydrangea

Angel Blush Hydrangea

On this Garden Bloggers Bloom Day I am celebrating blooms in two gardens, although I dearly hope it will not be too long before I am once again tending a single, small garden. In Greenfield the hydrangeas in the Shrub and Rose border are beginning to bloom even though they were planted only a month ago. Angel Blush is joined by Limelight and Firelight. These hydrangeas will form a beautiful privacy fence.

Button Bush

Buttonbush

Buttonbush was only planted two weeks ago, but once in the very wet ground it finally burst into bloom. It has been waiting in its pot for over a month.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

In Heath the Thomas Affleck rose continues to endure the rain, and all the other oddities of this year’s weather. Needless to say, another Thomas Affleck has been planted in Greenfield, but not permitted to bloom this year.

Purington rambler

Purington rambler

It has not been a great year for many of the rose bushes, but the Purington rambler hasn’t minded the bitter winter, or the undependable spring and summer. I wish someone could tell me how to properly weed such a vicious plant. I suppose putting it up on a fence might help instead of letting it tumble on the Rose bank.

The Fairy rose

The Fairy rose

Only a very few rose blossoms elsewhere in the garden, but I can always count on the Fairy even though she is a bit more petite this year.

Achillea Terra Cotta

Achillea Terra Cotta and yellow loossestrife

I am taking bits of the the various Achilleas and the old yellow loosestrife down to the new Greenfield garden.

Coneflowers

Coneflowers

The coneflowers are blooming in front of the pink cosmos which you can’t see, but they are very pretty together.

Daylily bank

Daylily Bank

Daylilies never mind any kind of difficult weather and this is their season.

Daylilies

Daylilies

Some of these daylilies are making their way down to the Greenfield garden.

Mothlight hydrangea

Mothlight hydrangea

The Mothlight hydrangea in Heath is about 12 years old and has never been so exuberant. Will the Greenfield hydrangeas look like this? Limelight and Pinky Winky are also just coming into bloom.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloom Day which gives us all a chance to share our gardens, and see what is blooming all over this great land. Click here for more blooms.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – June 2015

Flowery Mead

Flowery Mead aka The Lawn

On this June Garden Bloggers Bloom Day we feel summer has finally come to our hill in western Massachusetts.  Consistent warm weather has been a long time coming and some plants show cold damage that arrived all too late in the season. This section of our lawn remains a flowery mead because I have planted daffodils here and we have to wait  this long before mowing down the spent daffodil foliage.

Rugosa Apart

Rugosa Apart

At this time of the garden season we are madly preparing for the Annual Rose Viewing on June 28. This year it is the Last Rose Viewing because we will be moving to Greenfield very soon. This rugosa rose, Apart, is as beautiful and fragrant as ever, but the  bush did take a winter beating and is rather smaller than usual.

Harrison's Yellow rose

Harrison’s Yellow rose

Harrison’s Yellow is one of the earliest bloomers. There won’t be much left by the Rose Viewing.

Therese Bugnet rugosa

Therese Bugnet rugosa

Therese Bugnet has the delightful energetic spread of the rugosas, but her foliage is a bit smaller and finer. She is wonderfully fragrant. Other roses aare blooming, Dart’s Dash rugosa, two unamed but vigorous roses, one low and one tall, Rosa Rubrifolia (or Glauca), yellow Alchymist,  Woodslawn Pink, and Purinton Pink.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck is an astonishing rose, blooming early and late. I planted him near the door because the catalog promised fragrance, but that has never appeared.  You can see there is a little cold damage from a night or two ago. More roses have yet to bloom.

Mount Blanc rugosa and iris

Mount Blanc rugosa and iris

This isn’t a great photo of my favorite white rugosa, tall and fragrant Mount Blanc, or the iris, but I wanted to give them both credit for helping with bloom day. There are white and blue Siberian irises blooming here and there. I’ll take some to Greenfield for the new garden.

Peony

Herbaceous peony

Years ago I moved all the peonies I had planted right in front of the house. Somehow I left a bit of peony root – which has grown into this beautiful clump, surrounded by weeds, right next to the vegetable garden – also in dire need of weeding. The very pretty white lady’s bedstraw is a curse. Many of the peonies in the ‘new’ Peony Bed are late varieties – so chosen to make sure there is another spectacular plant in bloom for the Rose Viewing.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves

These foxgloves were given to me by a friend in the middle of last summer. They endured transplanting at an inauspicious season and are beautiful in this season.

daylily

Daylily

This is the first daylily to bloom on the Daylily Bank in front of the house. This will start to be a full Bank of Bloom once we get into July. I have brought a couple of these plants to the new garden in Greenfield.

Campanula 'Joan Elliott'

Campanula ‘Joan Elliott

As you can see, this clump of Joan Elliott has not been deterred by dividing and removing. Bits of root continue to grow and make flowers. I’m taking a bit of Joan from the lawn to Greenfield as well.

 

Columbine

Columbine

Several native columbines are blooming here and there. These are not the fancy columbines, but I treasure these – in white, pink and purple as well as this red and yellow. Garden Bloggers Bloom Day gives me a chance to praise these modest flowers.

Allium

Allium

I can’t find the name of this tall, large allium. I won’t plant it among the peonies ever again.

Salvia 'May Night'

Salvia “May Night’

The blue of ‘May Night’ seems blue-er this spring.

Trollius

Trollius

This clump of Trollius is paler than others, but lovely all the same.

Mock Orange

Mock Orange

The large mock orange is planted at the corner of the Cottage Ornee where its fragrance can waft inside.

Griffith Buck rose 'Applejack'

Griffith Buck rose ‘Applejack’

Every day we are closer to the Last Rose Viewing. Applejack will greet visitors as they arrive. This is one of the oldest roses at the End of the Road.

This is the last June Garden Bloggers Bloom Day at the End of the Road, but there will be many more to come in Greenfield. I thank Carol at May Dreams Gardens for giving us all the chance to show off  our bloomers all across this great land. To see more click here.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – May 2015

old apple tree in bloom

Old apple tree in bloom

It has been a  while since I have been able to post on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, but May has brought many blooms to the end of the road. Old apple trees and wild cherries  are blooming in the garden , along the road and in the fields.

Apple blossom closeup

Apple blossom closeup

Blooming trees are wonderful, and each blossom is a delight.

Sargent Crab

Sargent crabapple

The Sargent crabapple could not fit any more blossoms on itself.

Sargent crab apple blossoms

Sargent crab blossoms

Didn’t I tell you no more blossoms could fit on a branch?

Cotoneaster in bloom

Cotoneaster in bloom

I never get over my initial surprise that cotoneaster bears flowers!

Ornamental plum blooming

Ornamental plum blooming

How is it possible that I never noticed blossoms on this ornamental plum?  Could this year be the first time? The tree has to be at least 15 years old in this spot.

Bluets

Bluets

Sometimes bluets appear in the fields, or the lawn. These bluets seem almost white

Epimedium sulphureum

Epimedium sulphureum

This clump of Epimedium sulphureum has increased so much. So has Epimedium rubrum on the other side of this lawn bed.

Daffodils, Waldsteinia and tiarlla

Daffodils, Waldsteinia and tiarella

My idea was to get rid of grass, and this area on the road side of the Peony Bed is coming along. Waldsteinia or barren strawberry is a native groundcover that has little yellow strawberry-like flowers.  This isn’t a good photo but in the upper portion of the photo, up against the peonies is a growing section of tiarella. The white blossoms are so foamy that they don’t show up in a photo – even from this little distance.

lilacs

Lilacs

Not a great photo, but these are great old white lilacs that have been at the end of the road since long before we arrived. There are old lilac lilacs, too, but we have added pink Miss Canada and Pocahontas, the white Miss Ellen Willmott and the Beauty of Moscow. I just this moment noticed that these are all ladies.

Dandelions and violets

Dandelions and violets

There are other bloomers: the forsythia is going by; grape hyacinths in the lawn here and  there; a pot of sunny pansies; and of course, that common weed, the dandelion blooming in the lawn with violets and ground ivy. My own springtime flowery mead.

Carol, I am glad to be posting on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day once again. Thank you so much for hosting over at May Dreams Gardens. New dreams are coming true this May.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – October 2014

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day arrives this October after two hard freezes. The trees are richly adorned adding most of the garden color at this time of the year. The roses are very nearly done, but Thomas Affleck, right near the door, has nearly a dozen blossoms left. In the rest of the garden there are a few scattered rugosa blossoms, and The Fairy is still making a bit of magic.

Sedum 'Neon'

Sedum ‘Neon’

This is the second year for Sedum ‘Neon.” I will have to do some dividing. The Fairy is right behind her, as well as a snapdragon and a foxglove blooming at this odd time of year.

Chrysanthemum 'Starlet'

Chrysanthemum ‘Starlet’

“Starlet’ is a very hardy quilled mum that I keep moving around the garden.

Sheffield daisies

Sheffield daisies

The Sheffield daisies  are just beginning to bloom!  At least I have been calling these Sheffield daisies all year before they came into bloom, and now I am thinking they are some other very vigorous chrysanthemum. I have one clump of ‘mums’ not yet blooming. Maybe that is the Sheffie clump.

Asters

Asters

This low growing and very spready aster is definitely ‘Woods Blue.’ I just found the label while weeding today.

Montauk daisy

Montauk daisy

I am coming to realize that the Montauk daisy has quite a short bloom period. Maybe it doesn’t deserve to be so front and center.

Autumn crocus

Autumn crocus

A flower that does deserve to be more front and center is the Autumn Crocus. It is invisible in August when it should be transplants. Out of sight. Out of mind. Maybe next August.

'Limelight' hydrangea

‘Limelight’ hydrangea

The ‘Limelight’ hydrangea has had a good year and is doing better than ‘Pinky Winky’ planted at the same time, and the native oakleaf hydrangea. The enormous ‘Mothlight’ is also still blooming.

Lonicera sempervirens

Lonicera sempervirens

I am going to have to do something about this honeysuckle. She has grown enough this first full year and deserves to be arranged so she is more easily admired.

Cuphea

Cuphea

This annual potted Cuphea has given me a lot of pleasure this summer. Endless bloom.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums

I plant these nasturtiums on the slope between the Daylily Bank and a bed of the Early garden right in front of the house. Such a cheerful flowers.

Love Lies Bleeding

Love Lies Bleeding

And finally, in a knocked down tangle is Love Lies Bleeding. A right bloody mess. I expected long drooping tails of blossoms, but this looks like ropes of chenille balls.

What is blooming in your garden this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day?  Check Carol at May Dreams Gardens, our welcoming host.