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Scheduled Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – October 2018

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums

On this Garden Bloggers Bloom Day here in western Massachusetts I am ready to celebrate annuals – and others – who have survived the rains of this summer. Look at this sunny nasturtium – a volunteer from last year who swam happily this year through the summer.

Zinnias

Zinnias and

Marigolds

Marigolds

are always stalwart and shining.  The bees love them and are grateful for their long season. There are a couple of other other potted (nameless) annuals that also keep us cheerful.

Scaveola

Scaveola

This cheerful annual in front of the yellow twig dogwood found out it knew how to swim.

Geum

Geum

This geum, blooming next to the scaveola must have been inspired – enough to put out a couple of new blossoms.

Joe Pye Weed

Variegated Joe Pye Weed

This variegated Joe Pye weed is in full bloom – finally.

"The Fairy" rose

“The Fairy” Rose

The Fairy” rose will stand in for the other roses still putting out occasional blooms. “The Fairy” is just tough and remarkable.

Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas

The three hydrangeas are in full glorious bloom, but they are bowed low by all  the heavy rains.

Red Winterberry

Red Winterberry

Though not strictly in bloom, the red (and gold) winterberries have really enjoyed all the rain. We are swamp plants, you know, they remind us.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting the wonderful Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. Visit Carol and see what else is in bloom over this great land.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day Early – or Late?

asters

“Alma Potchke” asters on a early Bloom Day – or late – depending on  your view

I missed Garden Bloggers Bloom Day in September because we were out of town for a few days. So now I am posting an early view of my garden – or perhaps I am just later. Either way, there was and is, still  color as long as my ‘Alma Potchke’ aster is in bloom. No frost yet.

Boltonia and asters

Boltonia and asters

Boltonia is a wonderful perennial blooming lushly and late in the season. Usually it doesn’t need propping, but with all the heavy rain this one is laid a little low. The boltonia next to a rose bush in the South Border can relax a little on the rose.

variegated joe pye weed

Variegated Joe Pye Weed

This variegated Joe Pye weed is still in bloom, but the more common version which grows in a shadier spot in my garden is well finished for the season.

chelone or turtlehead

Chelone or turtlehead

My stand of chelone is substantial, at least 6 feet tall, and mostly upright, but again the heavy rains have given some stalks a bit of languid relaxation.

Red winterberry

Red winterberry

gold winterberry

Gold winterberry

The four winterberries in the garden are doing magnificently – Two red, one gold and one male. Please note that the winter berries, like the joe pye weed, amd chelone are all plants that often grow in the swamp. They are water lovers! Knowing that our garden was wet, we have chosen other plants (not blooming at this season) that are also water lovers – the dappled willow, elderberries, yellow twig dogwood, clethra and river birches. However, while the water lovers have thrived this year, other plants have struggled.

Potted annual

On the  other hand, there has been so much rain that this potted annual continues to bloom even though no one has been around to water it.

Nameless annual

And this nameless annual has grown happily all summer under the yellow twig dogwood, perfectly happy in the swamp.  As I have always said, there are many mysteries in the garden.

Water Gardens on Bloom Day – August 2018

bloom day

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day waterworks

On this Garden Bloggers Bloom Day the big event is water and more water. Just to give you the full force you  can see  how deep the water is right in front of the garden shed at the back of the garden. This is the worst spot, and it is the beginning of the lake the garden has become.

Black eyed susans

Black eyed susans in the bed nearest the back door

One of my hose guard wine bottles in ready to float away.

Thalictrum

Thalictrum aka meadow rue

Meadow rue has such tiny delicate flowers it doesn’t photograph very well, at least not for me, but I love it and don’t want to leave it off the Bloom Day list.

Cardinal Flower, daylilies 'altissima' and joe pye weed

Cardinal Flower, daylilies ‘altissima’ and joe pye weed

Beyond the joe pye weed is  the dappled willow – thriving in the flood – but it confuses the photo.

Joe pye weed

A different joe pye weed

This joe pye weed grows on the other side of the garden, next to a lavender Monarda fistulosa that is too weary and laid down to be photographed.

Honeysuckle and morning glories

Honeysuckle and morning glories

Set against the south fence the honeysuckle and Grandpa Ott morning glories don’t suffer very much.

Hydrangeas, phlox, roses

Hydrangeas, phlox, roses

These hydrangeas, phlox and roses are growing in the South Border, the driest part of the garden. the closer you get to the back garden, the wetter it gets.

Flowery hellstrip (tree strip) in front of the house

Flowery hellstrip (tree strip) in front of the house

I can give a nice Bloom Day hooray when we get to the hellsrip – echinacea, yarrow, still a couple of daylilies, Centaurea montana, and bee balms.  The rain has given rise to many many weeds.

Bloom day

A final Bloom Day view

On  this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day I give thanks for plants like the blacked susans and to Carol over at May Dreams Gardens who hosts a day when we can all share the delights and challenges of our gardens.

Daylilies on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – July 15, 2018

Bloom Day on the hellstrip

Bloom Day on the hellstrip

The hellstrip has been ready for Bloom Day for a while. Astilbe is ready to finish, but the Achillea, yarrow, coneflowers and daylilies have just begun their bloom days. Daylilies are the major stars right now.

double daylily

Double daylily

The week of days in the high 90s have not  bothered the daylilies one bit. Daylilies are used to heat, and dryness. I do have a list of my daylilies but I never seem to get the name and the flower attached to each other. Here are a few of my daylilies.

Lavender daylily

Lavender daylily

pale yellow day lily

Pale yellow daylily

 

Bee Balm

Bee Balm

In addition to all the daylilies, bee balm, a wonderful pollinator plant is in full bloom.

Button Bush

Button Bush

You wouldn’t think bees and other pollinators  would find the button bush of interest, but this is one of their favorite eating places.

To see what else is in bloom all across our great land visit Carol over at May Dreams Gardens.  Thank you, Carol!

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – June 15-2018 – Roses !

Thomas Affleck rose

Bloom Day and the Thomas Affleck Rose is in  full flower

I nearly forgot Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, so I raced out in the dawn to take photos (not very good ones) of what is blooming in the drizzle.  Thomas Affleck is a rose we grew for many years in Heath, and one of the first we planted in Greenfield. It is doing very well indeed.  No real fragrance though.

Polar Express rose

Kordes Polar Express

At least I think this is Polar Express. I’ll have to wait till  the other roses are blooming to make sure.

Kordes Purple rain rose

Kordes Purple Rain rose

This is a low growing rose and very sturdy. I have no idea why  they named it Purple Rain.

Mountain laurel

Mountain Laurel blooming beautifully on the hugel

honeysuckle

Honeysuckle blooming vigorously

delphinium

Lounging delphinium after rain. Stakes needed

Elderberry blossoms

Elderberry blossoms

The elderberries are for the bees and other pollinators. I never even noticed they were budded, much less beginning to bloom. My eyes have been on the weeds on the ground as I prepare for garden club guests next week. Yikes!

Lilac tree blossoms

Lilac Tree Blossoms

The most unusual flowering plant in my new garden is this lilac tree (a true  syringa) that blooms at  this time of the year.  The blooms last a long time and are strongly fragrant, perfuming half the neighborhood.  The tree is good size, a little taller than my neighbor’s house and it is full of blossoms.  They do not smell like lilacs, but they are wonderfully sweet.

I thank Carol at May Dreams Gardens who hosts Bloom Day and gives us all the chance to see what is blooming all over this great land.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day – May 15, 2018

primrose

Primroses on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day

The Texas sun seemed to be shining on these glowing golden primroses on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. The garden had hardly any blooms when we left for Texas on May  but our return on May 8 was astounding. I am going to  give a thorough pictorial record of our May 15 blooms.

creamy primroses

Creamy primroses

I’m behind on my spring clean up and weeding so you’ll likely see plenty of weeds. These primroses are increasing nicely. The tall Japanese primroses will be along soon.

Iris reticulata

Iris reticulata

These are the first irises to bloom in the garden.

Dicentra bleeding heart

Dicentra, bleeding heart

This white bleeding heart  was recently given to me in full bloom. Fortunately it adjusted to its new site comfortably.

Grape hyacinths

Grape hyacinths

I don’t remember planting these grape hyacinths last fall. I’m glad  I waited for a while before pulling up the first shoots.

Geum

Geum

This geum is a wonderful plant. I love the color of the blooms and it is in bloom for a very long season. It also increases at a slow rate and occasionally sends a baby plant off to the side.

Fairy bells, Disporum flavens

Fairy Bells, Disporum flavens

These Fairy Bells throw out shoots at  the same time as Solomon’s Seal, followed by the yellow bells. The bells will last for a couple of weeks, and the foliage will look handsome all season. These are native  to Korea, but they like damp woodlands – which describes their position in the garden.

Wood poppy Stylophorum diphyllum

Wood poppy Stylophorum diphyllum

Also called Celandine poppy. It looks very like, only larger, a weed that grows next to my house. More research needed.

Zizia? Golden Alexanders?

These plants are growing riotously next to the wood poppies. I thought I was planting Golden Alexanders, but one knowledgeable friend said  this was not accurate.  Does anyone have any ideas?

Waldsteinia or barren strawberry

Waldsteinia or barren strawberry

I planted barren strawberry plants along the top of the stone wall, and in front of the rhododendrons. They have done just what I hope for – covering the ground with a dense mat that does a great job of keeping down the weeds. It will only bloom for a while and the very low foliage looks great all season.

Jacob's ladder

Jacob’s ladder

 

I just moved two clumps of Jacob’s ladder out from under the yellow twig dogwood which has achieved an amazing spread. They have adjusted nicely to their place in  the sun. Well, a little more sun  than they had.

Fringed bleeding heart

Fringed bleeding heart

Bleeding heart

Gold Heart Dicentra

Now I have three different Dicentras: white, fringed and Gold Heart. I love them all.

Summer snowflake

Leucojum aestivum or Summer snowflake

Hard to know why these are called Summer Snowflakes when then bloom so early in the spring – but they are later than the snowdrops.

Fothergilla

Fothergilla

The Fothergilla looks great – just like  the one on the Bridge of Flowers.

Korean Spice Bush

Korean Spice Bush, Viburnum carlesii

Korean Spice bush is famous for its fragrance.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. Go on over and see what is in bloom over our great land.

 

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – January 15, 2018

Rain Flood Ice

Rain Flood Ice

Bloom Day is here, but there are no blooms outdoors.

Amaryllis

Amaryllis

But for the first time in a couple of years I have blooms in January.  The amaryllis that is opening was an early Christmas present and it grew rapidly. The amaryllis with  buds about to open spent the summer out in my garden and is giving me great gratification Two other amaryllis bulbs that spent the summer in the ground are coming along – slowly. I have hopes.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Bloom Day.

An Early Bloom Day – before hard frost

Sheffield daisies

Sheffield daisies

Will my garden be blooming on November 15. the official Garden Bloggers Bloom Day? Maybe not. Therefore, I went around the garden today taking photos of the flowers blooming this very unusually warm November day. We have yet to have a hard frost although some plants were bitten and succumbed. This is what’s left on this gloomy day with a temperature of 50 degrees at 4 in the afternoon

Knockout red rose

Knockout red rose still budding

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose in a languorous pose

Limelight hydrangea

” one of three hydrangeas blooming

Nasturtiums

Annual nasturtium still sending out new blossoms

Butterfly Argyanthemum frutescens

Proven Winner Butterfly still blooming

Toad lilies – Tricyrtis

Red winterberry

Winterberry – holiday color if not a bloom

English holly

English holly right by the front steps

Daylight savings left, Eastern Standard time arrived and so did the 5 o’clock dark. But winter is not here yet so I celebrate this bloom day.

Bloom Day – September 2017

Coreopsis

Coreopsis

At the moment I am celebrating Garden Bloggers Bloom Day with a burst of heat – after rain storms and night temperatures that went down to 35 degrees. But many plants are hitting their stride, like this coreopsis – one of several.

Cardinal flowers

Cardinal flowers

It turns out the cardinal flowers I planted last year – are a different color than the cardinal flowers I planted this year. But no matter. My mentor, Elsa Bakalar, assured me all shades of red go together.

Perennial aageratum and veronica

Perennial ageratum and veronica

The perennial ageratum and veronica are carrying on an autumnal love affair with lots of hugs.

Firelight hydrangea

Firelight hydrangea

The Firelight hydrangea is also being embraced by a nameless white aster and the bright pink Alma Potchke aster who just started to bloom.

honeysuckle

Honeysuckle

The honeysuckle clasps the fence in a tight hold while its bloom are entwined with  a few Grandpa Ott morning glories.

Japanese anemone

Japanese anemone

The Japanese anemone is less robust, but next year I think she’ll be more enthusiastic.

Neon sedum

Neon sedum

This “Neon” sedum attracts bees by the dozen.

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

These rudbeckias were given me by a neighbor in the spring. Next spring I am going to be looking for another neighbor who needs rudbeckia, loved by pollinators

Marigolds and nasturtiums

Marigolds and nasturtiums

This pot by my back door is a riot of color. Makes me so happy in my coming and going.

Click on over to May Dreams Gardens where Carol gives us a chance share our seasonal bloom. Thank you, Carol!

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – August 15, 2017

Hellstrip

Hellstrip with many pollinator flowers on Bloom Day

Here is the August Bloom Day report. The summer of 2017 has been relatively cool, with only a few days that went over 89 degrees. We  also had rain – almost sufficient to my desires. The hellstrip in front of the house is full of bloom – daylilies, bee balm, yarrow, coneflowers, and marigolds. Weeds and fallen sycamore bark as well.

Folksinger rose

Folksinger rose

Several of the roses are blooming again. Folksinger, a Griffith Buck rose, is the most enthusiastic.

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck rose

Thomas Affleck was a great rose for me in Heath, and it remains a great rose in Greenfield. I will let these two roses stand in for Purple Rain, The Fairy, Polar Express, Red Kockout, Peach Drift and Paprika.

Clethra

Clethra alnifolia with bee balm and thalictrum in background

The clethra is gaining stature and so is the bee balm. That is a rain-bowed thalictrum in the background. There will have to be substantial dividing and rearranging in the fall.

Honeysuckle and morning glory

Honeysuckle and Grandpa Ott morning glory

The honeysuckle has a substantial but hidden trellis while the Grandpa Ott morning glory is hanging on to a couple of stakes and the fence.

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

When my friend gave me some small divisions this spring I misunderstood the gift. These rudbeckias look great this year, but I think I will have to find  someone in the spring to share with myself.

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa

Monarda fistulosa is a wonderful pollinator plant. I have two other bee balms, one is Colrain Red, and the other is a darker, more winey red.

Culver's Root

Culver’s Root

Culver’s Root is another plant chosen because it is a pollinator magnet, as are two types of mountain mint, still bloom and feeding pollinators.

Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias tuberosa

The Asclepias area is filling out, but the season is starting to go by.

Limelight hydrangea

Limelight hydrangea

Three hydrangeas are a major part of the South Border. The most easterly is Limelight. This is the third summer for all three.

Angel's Blush hydrangea

Angel’s Blush hydrangea

Angel’s Blush is just beginning to show shades of pink, that don’t really show in this photo.

Firelight hydrangea

Firelight hydrangea

You can see the blooming sedums on the ground and an aster clump that will be blooming next month.

Asters

Asters

These tall asters with sprays of very small flowers are the first to bloom.

This has been the third summer for our garden. We began planting the South Border in June of 2015. We are so happy to see everything making the show we hoped for and look forward to rearranging in the fall ans 2018 spring to do a bit of simplifying.

I thank Carol over at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Bloom Day. Go and visit and see what else is blooming over all  our great land.